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Image: 1487
Creator
Date
 
 
Title
Strada Nova, Venetian Cityscape
 
Materials
Dimensions
Stone, brick construction 
 
Repository
City
 
Venice (Italy) 
Temporary Cataloging
Venice comprises more than one hundred islands with roughly 150 intersecting canals, connected by nearly 400 bridges. The waterways of Venice are as important as the streets. Internal Rii (canals) only usually have about 2 meters depth of water (depending on tide) with a width of 4 to 5 meters. Long narrow streets that flank the length of canal are known as fondamenta. Bridges were originally flat and suitable for horse traffic which was still in use until the 15th century. The Grand Canal and the Giudecca Canal are the largest waterways, followed by the Cannaregio Canal. The alleyway streets, known as calli are flanked by buildings on either side. Barbacani can stick out over the calli; extended rooms or enclosed balconies held up by wooden joists. Calli open into Campi (campo, singular) which were originally open grassy spaces where animals were fed and penned. These are generally faced by a church. Location within the city is determined by campo or chiesa (church), not by street. A vere da pozzo, or wellhead, is also always present in the center of the campo; providing the area homes with water. Corti (courts) and campielli are smaller open spaces, less than the campi. Medium width streets with houses and shops are called ruga or rughetta. Rio terra is a filled in canal that has become a street, the first streets to be paved were called salizzade. Ramo is a small track of street connecting 2 bigger streets. Finally sottoportici are covered passageways or narrow passages open beneath private houses.  
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Virtual Reality: 41
Creator
Date
Matteo Raverti  
1420-1434 
Title
Ca d'Oro, First floor, Side room
 
Materials
Dimensions
 
 
Repository
City
 
Venice (Italy) 
Temporary Cataloging
Ca d'Oro, View of the alcove or chapel on the first floor with a rich 15th century ceiling created by Franchetti for painting of Saint Sebastian by Mantegna (1506). 
Note